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Catawba Valley Pottery of North Carolina
This website was created to serve as an informational and educational tool concerning Catawba Valley Folk-Art Potters and their wares. CVPNC is committed to the preservation of the tradition of Catawba Valley pottery. These potters are dedicated to traditional 19th century methods almost lost in the first half of the 20th century. Burlon Craig of Vale, NC, continued the 19th century methods of pottery making for many years as the last "old-time" potter and by doing so, kept the Catawba Valley tradition alive. Fortunately, there were a few potters who worked with Burlon in his later years before his passing. Burlon would then pass the traditional methods of pottery making to the next generation, just as it was passed to him many years before. It is our mission to continue, in the sprit of Burlon, to keep the Catawba Valley Pottery tradition alive and well for many generations to come.
(http://www.cvpottery.com/)

Craft Revival: Shaping Western North Carolina Past and Present
Craft Revival Digital Collection, Hunter Library, Western Carolina University. This website tells the story of the historic Craft Revival and its impact on western North Carolina. During the Revival, North Carolina makers shaped clay, in turn shaping the attitudes and values that contribute to today's appreciation of the handmade object. Makers wove cotton, linen, and wool, weaving a sense of community that contributes to a strong sense of place. Craftsmen hammered metal, forging partnerships to effect change. Artisans worked with wood, building a regional economy based on individual talent and entrepreneurship. Craft Revival activities emphasized quality, individuality, and workmanship. These values remain evident in a 21st-century region that is both dynamic and progressive.
(http://www.wcu.edu/craftrevival/index.htm)

Town of Chapel Hill, NC, Community Clay Studio
The Community Clay Studio is located next to the Parks and Recreation Administrative Offices (200 Plant Road), behind Community Center Park (120 S. Estes Drive). With an abundance of natural light, eight pottery wheels, three kilns and 1,500 square feet of well-equipped studio space, this arts studio is unmatched in our community. Pottery and other clay classes are offered for adults and children year-round, and a clay arts camp is held for children every summer. Our programs are suitable for building children's growth in self-expression, supporting adult career changes and/or simply serving as inspiration to artistic abilities. Our instructors are well qualified and focused on serving the community. For info visit (http://www.townofchapelhill.org/index.aspx?page=1490).

Chapel Hill Museum
The Chapel Hill Museum, 523 East Franklin St., Chapel Hill, NC. Ongoing display of the Museum's pottery collection - Farmer/James Pottery - North Carolina Art Pottery Collection 1900-1960. The exhibit features pottery by North Carolinian and southern potters, from a significant survey collection of southern art pottery. A portion of the 280-piece collection will be on display permanently, demonstrating the movement of art pottery displacing utilitarian pottery made here in NC and throughout the South. Noted author and folklore expert, Dr. A. Everrette James, and his wife, Dr. Nancy Farmer, have generously gifted the Chapel Hill Museum with this significant survey collection of southern art pottery. The Museum also offers an Educational Program - North Carolina Pottery and History of Pottery. Developed for the eighth grade, this program uses examples from the Museum's 300-piece pottery collection to interpret the culture and lives of North Carolinians from the mid-1800s through the present day. This program travels to schools for presentations to eighth grade classes. Home school groups and other small groups can experience the program at the Museum. All of the Museum's programs are provided free of charge. This program satisfies State of North Carolina history curriculum goals. It is aligned with the eighth grade course presentation on life in North Carolina during the early part of the 20th century. Museum hours are : Wed.-Sat., 10am-4pm & Sun. 1-4pm. For further information call 919/967-1400 / fax (919) 967-6230 or visit (www.chapelhillmuseum.org).

Supplies

Highwater Clays - Asheville, NC
(http://www.highwaterclays.com/)

STARworks Ceramics Materials & Research - Star, NC
(http://www.starworksnc.org/Ceramics/ceramics.htm)

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Carolina Arts is published monthly by Shoestring Publishing Company, a subsidiary of PSMG, Inc. Copyright© 1987-2012 by PSMG, Inc., which published Charleston Arts from July 1987 - Dec. 1994 and South Carolina Arts from Jan. 1995 - Dec. 1996. It also publishes Carolina Arts Online, Copyright© 1998-2012 by PSMG, Inc. All rights reserved by PSMG, Inc. or by the authors of articles. Reproduction or use without written permission is strictly prohibited. Carolina Arts is available throughout North & South Carolina.

 

 

Carolina Arts is published monthly by Shoestring Publishing Company, a subsidiary of PSMG, Inc. Copyright© 2010 by PSMG, Inc., which published Charleston Arts from July 1987 - Dec. 1994 and South Carolina Arts from Jan. 1995 - Dec. 1996. It also publishes Carolina Arts Online, Copyright© 2010 by PSMG, Inc. All rights reserved by PSMG, Inc. or by the authors of articles. Reproduction or use without written permission is strictly prohibited. Carolina Arts is available throughout North & South Carolina.