Archive for the ‘Arts FUnding’ Category

A Trip to See Several Exhibits in the Pee Dee Area of South Carolina in July 2014 – Part II

Wednesday, July 23rd, 2014

On a day when it was thundering and lightening around the lake here in Bonneau, SC, I decided to head over to the Pee Dee area of South Carolina, to see a few exhibits on view in Florence, SC, and Lake City, SC, just an hour’s drive north on Hwy. 52. If the computer had to be unplugged, why not go somewhere else where the weather is not so angry.

Part I, about my visit to the Jones-Carter Gallery in Lake City, SC, (home to the ArtFields event) can be seen at this link.

In Part II of this installment, I’m going to cover a subject I’ve talked about several times in the last few years, and that’s the growing arts district in downtown Florence, SC. It had been almost a year since my last trip to see an exhibit at the Art Trail Gallery and I was looking forward to seeing all the changes that had taken place during that time frame. I’ve also been waiting for almost six months to get a close look at the public art that was being installed in this district.

Downtown Florence, like many cities across America has a lot to work with as far as vacant buildings that can be rehabbed and buildings that will need to come down to make new open spaces and in the last 3-4 years I’ve been going there you could see signs of a makeover taking place.

So when I got to Florence after leaving Lake City, SC, I parked across from where the old Art Trail Gallery was on S. Dargan Street – where I knew Big Bleu Birdnanna, a towering sculpture by Mike and Patz Fowle was standing – the first piece of outdoor work to be placed in the new arts district by REdiscovering Downtown Florence, a division of the Florence Downtown Development Corporation.

I’ve seen photos of the big bird, but I wanted to see it myself before I reported about it. Once I got out of the car I could really see that a lot of work has been done since I was last in this area.

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Patz Fowle working on design of sculpture

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Installation

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Big Bleu Birdnanna today

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Another view

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Impressive sign for sculpture – any guess as to who made this?

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Many artists wish the sign for their sculpture ID sign was this good

After taking a few photos of Big Bleu Birdnanna, I followed a walkway to another open space that would lead me to the Art Trail Gallery on West Evans Street, but before I got there I discovered another open space which was totally changed since I was last in Florence. It was called the James Allen Plaza. I’m not sure who James Allen was but I’m sure he was someone important to downtown Florence or someone who gave them money to do this space. And, here I found the handiwork of Bob Doster, the man of metal, from Lancaster, SC. I’m telling you – his work is going to be everywhere someday.

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Sign for James Allen Plaza

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Here we see that Bob Doster has been here – it’s no surprise

Three of the pieces were influenced by students from local schools, including the Swallowtail Butterflies and Yellow Jasmine designed by Williams Middle School students. Doster works with a lot of school children all over the state helping them make sculptures.

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“Swallowtail Butterflies,” by Bob Doster with the help of Dredan Brown, Caroline Ham, Lyle Detalo, Marquise Brewer, Ryan Byrd, Hannah Culpeper, Rocye Anderson, and Haven Rector

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“Yellow Jasmine,” by Bob Doster with the help of Henry Frierson, Jazmyn Rowell, Caleb Farrell, Ciona Gray, Lilly Huiet, Hannah Rose Carter, and Ezra Smolen-Morton

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Unknown title, by Bob Doster, with the help of Lauren Bynum, Lelley Pierce, and Hannah Gandy, from unknown school

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Rendition of the City of Florence Seal, by Bob Doster

Here’s a little pitch for REdiscovering Downtown Florence:

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REdiscovering Downtown membership is similar to memberships other downtown groups have, but focuses just on public art rather than business promotion.

Arts and culture is a very important component of the downtown revitalization process and creating public art will make the area more inviting and encourage both locals and tourists to REdiscover the historic heart of our community.

With your support, public art will be purchased each year and be placed in downtown courtyards and all the streetscape of Evans and Dargan streets. The city of Florence is providing matching dollars for this project utilizing funds from the fees collected from Sundays alcohol sales. This means that every dollar you donate will leverage public funds to help grow art downtown.

For further info and to become a member visit (http://www.florencedowntown.com/arts-culture/rediscover/).

The rest of the time before the reception started for the exhibit at the Art Trail Gallery was spent walking around W. Evans Street and S. Dargan taking photos of some of the buildings which now hold new businesses and some that will soon hold new businesses – in Florence’s new arts district.

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Another open space on W. Evans Street

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Businesses on S. Dargan Street, near W. Evans Street

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More signs of change – building coming down near Irby and W. Evans Street

I understand the new Florence County Museum will be opening sometime in October of this year, and that will add another big cornerstone in that arts district.

Things are happening in South Carolina’s Pee Dee area.

North Carolina Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC, Has Remarkable Success with Fundraiser

Tuesday, September 11th, 2012

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The North Carolina Pottery Center’s recent auction raised over $50,000, almost double last year’s total. One long term supporter of NCPC wrote, “The Pottery Center provided everyone a fun, festive evening and an opportunity to support a state treasure. It was indeed ‘the place’ to be.

Held at Leland Little’s Auction and Estate Sales in Hillsborough, NC, the evening began with patrons selecting a handmade plate donated by a talented North Carolina potter. Next up was a delicious gourmet supper of food prepared by five of the Triangle’s most celebrated chefs, which everyone thoroughly enjoyed.

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The satisfied diners were then invited to bid on pots donated by many of the state’s best-known potters, and spirited rivalries erupted from all sides of the hall, as Leland Little enthusiastically raised the bidding ever-higher on each successive item.

Combined with the Pottery Center’s recent Z. Smith Reynolds grant to help fund an Executive Director’s position, the results from the auction clearly indicate wide appreciation for all that NCPC does to promote awareness of North Carolina’s world-class pottery heritage through exhibitions, education, outreach, and visitor service. Located in Seagrove, NC, just south of Asheboro, NC, it’s a great tourist destination, and serves as the perfect start to a visit of area potteries.

If you’ve never been to the Pottery Center, or haven’t been for a while, perhaps you are sufficiently intrigued to make a trip to Seagrove to visit this sweet museum that is the backbone of this fascinating community of potters.

Thank you to our Auction Sponsors: First Bank, Leland Little Auction and Estate Sales, Shelton Vineyards, Katie B. Morris, Progress Energy, Carolina Arts, Gardner Heating and Air, Kimberly Woodard, Community One, Hans Klaussner Foundation and The Courier Tribune.

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The mission of the North Carolina Pottery Center is to promote public awareness of and appreciation for the history, heritage, and ongoing tradition of pottery making in North Carolina. The Center is located at 233 East Avenue in Seagrove, NC. Hours of operation are Tue. – Sat., 10am – 4pm.

For more information, please call 336/873-8430 or go to (www.ncpotterycenter.org).

SC Arts Commission Saved Again, But Just Barely – the 2012 Version

Monday, July 30th, 2012

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I think the first paragraph of the article written by Otis R. Taylor, Jr. in The State newspaper after the big rally says it all.

“The State House was under an umbrella of creativity Monday evening as hundreds of arts supporters met on the grounds to oppose Gov. Nikki Haley’s veto of the South Carolina Arts Commission budget.”

You can read the whole article at this link (http://www.thestate.com/2012/07/17/2356789/arts-supporters-rally.html#storylink=cpy).

Even Columbia’s Free Times newspaper reported that only “hundreds flocked to the State House for a colorful pro-arts rally”.

A Facebook event page was created, Rally for the Arts – Support the SC Arts Commission, which invited 13,327 Facebook members (people involved with the arts in SC) to join in, yet only 1,688 “claimed” they would show up at the rally, while 578 others said – maybe. Yet only hundreds showed up.

Some will say the weather kept people away, but if I was the Arts Commission I wouldn’t want to count on my fair-weather friends to save me again and again, as this battle over the Arts Commission’s future isn’t over.

The main point here is – the SC Arts Commission was never in real danger of being eliminated – it was all a bunch of political show.

Our Tea-Bagger Governor wants to eliminate the Arts Commission altogether, which is wrong, but the Legislature has other plans. The House lawmakers approved a bill that would have moved the Arts Commission into the Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism, much like the way North Carolina handles its arts agency, but the Senate did not vote on the bill. Hopefully that will happen this next session and the Arts Commission will be reorganized with a different mission, some different staff members, and hopefully not many of the Commission’s “rubber stamp” board members – if any.

The Governor claims that the Arts Commission’s overhead is too high and I hate to have to agree with her on that point. I couldn’t begin to explain what 20 staff members do on a daily basis at the Arts Commission. And, their expenses do seem to be out of whack for an agency with such a small budget – under $4 million this year. They even had to move the agency into cheaper digs this year to stay under the 30 percent overhead mandated last year by the Legislature. And, the Governor is not happy about the executive director, Ken May’s salary – $91,664 a year. Which does seem high for an agency with such a small budget.

I looked at some other SC State agency’s budgets and pay their executives get and I was a little surprised. Take the Sea Grant Consortium, which was also on the Gov’s chopping block. They have a $6 million budget, but their executive director is only making $83,408. This agency has the same number of employees, a bigger budget, but the top person makes less money.

The head of the Budget and Control Board makes $173,380, but that agency deals with almost $1/2 billion and the head of the Department of Transportation which deals in billions only makes $146,000. Wouldn’t you think an executive’s salary would have some relationship to their budget?

I’d say Ken May’s salary is a big part of the Arts Commission’s overhead – in relation to it’s budget. Is it too much? I know a smaller salary would mean more funding for arts projects.

I’ve heard some talk that the Legislature is thinking about an audit of the Arts Commission which may revel more about where the money is going. That might clear the air some, but I would prefer they get on with the business of re-organizing state government before our Governor comes up with some new ideas about pleasing her Tea Bag supporters. She might start giving the Arts Commission’s board the Darla Moore treatment.

So who showed up at the big rally? Mostly people from Columbia. And, I’m not surprised about that. They are close to the Arts Commission – a centralized agency based in Columbia with no branches in other areas of the state. These were the people who see the Arts Commission staff at their performances, their exhibits, and in the grocery stores and restaurants of Columbia.

Here’s an example of how Columbia oriented the control of the arts are in South Carolina. Take a look at the SC Arts Foundation who the Arts Commission is in “partnership” with – sharing address, staff and phone numbers, but are totally separate – so they say.

The South Carolina Arts Foundation Board of Directors 2011-2012

Michel G. Moore, Columbia, President
Debra Timmerman, Charlotte, Vice President
Childs Cantey Thrasher, Columbia, Vice President
Jeffry C. Caswell, Columbia, Treasurer
Victoria Hollins, Columbia, Secretary
Patrick R. Van Huss, Columbia, Immediate Past President
Miller G. Bannister, Columbia
Gloria M. Bell, Charleston
Maryanne Belser, Columbia
Jerelyn “Jeri” Boysia, Columbia
Eric Brown, Greenville
J. Ashley Cooper, Charleston
Fannie I. “Judy” Cromwell, Greenville
Beryl Dakers, Columbia
James M. Dedman, IV, Greenville
Chandra Foster, Fort Mill
Shani Gilchrist, Columbia
Sarah Lynn Hayes, Rock Hill – Ex Officio
Robert Hoak, Greenville
Pamela L. Jenkins, Columbia
Robin Leverton, Beaufort
Ken May, Columbia – Ex Officio (Non-Voting)
J. Michael McCabe, Columbia
Rhett Outten, Mt. Pleasant
Donna Pullen, West Columbia
Ruth Rast, Columbia
Peggy Reynolds, Beaufort
Elizabeth Sowards, Chapin – Ex Officio
Linda C. Stern, Columbia
Leo F. Twiggs, Orangeburg
Bhavna Vasudeva, Columbia
John Whitehead, Columbia

All but one officer is from Columbia. Out of 32 members, 18 are from Columbia (more than half the board), 4 are from Greenville, 3 from the Charleston area, 2 from the Rock Hill area, 2 from Beaufort, 1 from Orangeburg, 1 from Chapin, and 1 from Charlotte, NC (?). I’d like to hear the story of why one of the members lives in Charlotte, NC.

There are no members from North Charleston (3rd largest city in SC), Spartanburg, Aiken, Florence, Hilton Head, Myrtle Beach, Sumter or any of the smaller communities in the state – other than Chapin, which is just outside of Columbia. Why are so many from Columbia?

Of course many of these same folks jump back and forth from the board of the Arts Commission to the board of the SC Arts Foundation – and back again. I can’t remember when a few of these folks haven’t been on one or the other of the boards.

It’s no wonder there weren’t rallies all over the state to save the Arts Commission or people traveling from far ends of the state to the rally in Columbia. The representation isn’t there for the whole state. And, for many around the state like me – we didn’t notice a thing different when the Arts Commission was shut down and won’t notice a thing now that their doors are open again. The Arts Commission isn’t there for us – they’re only there for non-profits and a few individuals.

South Carolina needs to continue to support the arts with our tax dollars, but we also need to shake things up and re-organize the arts structure in the state and change some of the faces in control. We are way behind our neighbor to the North in making the arts a productive part of our state’s economy (at the bank – not just on paper) – and not just thought of as a burden.

Let’s hope the Legislature does something soon.

The North Carolina Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC, Receives Z. Smith Reynolds Grant

Wednesday, July 18th, 2012

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The Board of Directors and Staff, on behalf of our Membership, are pleased to announce that the North Carolina Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC, has been awarded a grant from the Zachary Smith Reynolds Foundation, Inc.  This special grant for $65,000 will be distributed over a two-year period and will serve as the core support for the installation of a new executive director.

The NCPC is very excited about this opportunity to begin a nationwide search for a new museum director. This is a remarkable accomplishment for the NCPC given the present economic climate. By finding the NCPC worthy of this financial award, the Trustees of the Z Smith Reynolds Foundation, Inc., have demonstrated their confidence in the museum to bring stability and economic development to the pottery communities of our state. In keeping with the mission of the NCPC, to promote and preserve our state’s continuing pottery traditions, this grant will bring us the leadership required to move it forward into new partnerships, resource sharing, increased educational offerings, greater exposure, on-going exciting exhibitions, workshops, and off-site events.

The Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation, Inc., was founded in 1936 and named as a memorial for the youngest son of the founder, R. J. Reynolds. In 1951 the foundation was increased by a trust from the uncle, William Neal Reynolds.   The Foundation, now comprised of the income from the ZSR Trust and the W. N. Reynolds Trust, has distributed grants to recipients of all 100 North Carolina counties, totaling more than $493 million. The NCPC is very honored to be one of the latest recipients of this prestigious award. This endorsement will provide the NCPC with valuable standing as it approaches a new future of vigorous partnerships targeted towards the promotion and preservation of our pottery and the arts.

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The mission of the North Carolina Pottery Center is to promote public awareness of and appreciation for the history, heritage, and ongoing tradition of pottery making in North Carolina.

The Center is located at 233 East Avenue in Seagrove, NC. Hours of operation are Tue. – Sat., 10am – 4pm.

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Also, don’t forget the Pottery Center will be hosting its 13th Annual Auction, “Going, Going, Gone to Pots,” on Thursday, Aug. 23, 2012, at Leland Little Auction & Estate Sales in Hillsborough, NC. This year there will be an unprecedented, star-studded, pre-auction supper, called, “Fill Your Plate,” with food prepared by several of the Triangle’s best chefs, and served on plates made by North Carolina potters. You can read all about it at this link.

For more information, please call 336/873-8430 or go to (www.ncpotterycenter.org).