Archive for the ‘WNC Visual Arts’ Category

Center for Craft, Creativity and Design in Hendersonville, NC, Offers Exhibit on the Legacy of Harvey K. Littleton

Friday, November 30th, 2012

Editor’s Note: Earlier this year we informed readers that 2012 was the 50th Anniversary of the Studio Glass Movement in America. We did a special feature on many of the glass exhibits that were being offered in celebration of that anniversary – most taking place in Western North Carolina – home to many a glass artist. We didn’t learn about this exhibit until after it was too late to fit it into our Dec. 2012 issue of Carolina Arts, but we’re bringing it to you now as best we can. Hopefully through this blog, Facebook and Twitter – the word will reach many of our readers.

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The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design in Hendersonville, NC, is presenting Harvey’s Legacy: The Next Generation of Studio Glass in Western North Carolina, an exhibit featuring works by studio glass pioneer Harvey K. Littleton as well as 12 exceptional glass artists of generations X and Y who are working in the region, curated by Lauren Pelletier, Administrative Assistant at CCC&D. An opening reception will be held at the Center’s gallery in Hendersonville on Thursday, Dec. 6, 2012, from 5-7pm and is open and free to the public. The exhibition will continue through Jan. 7, 2013; the Center will be closed Dec. 21-31, 2012.

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Harvey K. Littleton, Longitudinally Sectioned Flattened Ovoid, 1981, 18 x 3 3/4 x 4 inches each.

The American Studio Glass movement began with two glass workshops held at the Toledo Museum of Art in 1962. The workshops were taught by Harvey K. Littleton, who, along with scientist Dominick Labino, introduced a small furnace built for glassworking that made it possible for individual artists to work in independent studios. Since then, glass has been embraced by artists not only for production purposes, but as a sculptural medium for exploring contemporary issues and concepts.

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Harvey Littleton at the 1962 workshop. Photo by Robert C. Florian. Collection of the Rakow Research Library of The Corning Museum of Glass.

The exhibition celebrates the 50th anniversary of Littleton’s groundbreaking workshops using a small furnace built for glass craft, which helped trigger the development of studio art glass in America. Littleton settled in Western North Carolina’s Toe River valley after his retirement and that area now boasts a growing community of more than 50 notable glass artists.

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Harvey Littleton in his studio in Wisconsin. Photo by Robert C. Florian.

The other glass artists participating in this exhibit include: Kathryn Adams, Dean Allison, Alex Bernstein, Jennifer Bueno, Courtney Dodd, Ben Elliott, Micah Evans, Ben Greene-Colonnese, Clay Hufford, Mike Krupiarz, Justin Turcotte, and Hayden Wilson. To learn more about these artists visit thislink.

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Work by Ben Elliott

“This exhibition features artists early to mid career artists, 40 and under, working in Western North Carolina. The artists selected have either studied glass at universities or spent time at craft institutions like Penland School of Crafts, Pilchuck Glass School or The Studio at Corning Museum of Glass with programs that have lineage to Littleton’s experimentation,” said curator Lauren Pelletier.

“I was inspired by the 50th anniversary shows like Toe River Art Council’sGlass in the Mountains that have done a thorough job highlighting the rich history of the studio glass movement in the region. I see Harvey’s Legacyas a complement to those shows, with a narrower focus on emerging talent and the influence of higher education as it relates to our mission and core programming at the Center.”

“My interest in glass began after taking undergraduate coursework in glassblowing, casting, beadmaking and stained glass and continued later during a flameworking apprenticeship I had shortly after moving to Asheville in 2011,” adds Pelletier. “Having an understanding of the material and a familiarity with artists working in this area, I made selections for this show to include variety in experience, techniques and processes.”

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Work by Clayton Hufford

“Western North Carolina is made up of incredible communities of craft artists that support each other and learn together. The Center is delighted to have the chance to present an exhibition of these emerging artists in celebration of the 50th anniversary of studio glass,” said CCC&D Executive Director Stephanie Moore.

“When glass enters the sculptural arena it is mesmerizing.  The impressive work highlights the skill of the makers who are pushing the limits of this incredibly fragile material.”

During the reception on Thursday, Dec. 6, from 5-7pm, at the Center, located at 1181 Broyles Road in Hendersonville, there will be a sale of glass artworks offered. Those attending will also be able to purchase hand-made pint glasses, filled courtesy of Highland Brewing Company, with a portion of the proceeds benefiting glass art instruction in the region.

There will also be a raffle during this reception to win hot shop and flameworking classes at the Asheville Glass Center, private lessons from exhibitors Kathryn Adams and Hayden Wilson, as well as vases, ornaments, and more.

A portion of proceeds from the raffle and gallery sales will go towards subsidizing the first glass course at Warren Wilson College as well as future programming by The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design.

On Saturday, Dec. 8, 2012, from 10am-6pm, join the Asheville Glass Center staff and exhibitors Kathryn Adams, Ben Elliott, Ben Greene-Colonnese, Justin Turcotte, Hayden Wilson with special guests Alex Bernstein, Penland Resident Artist Micah Evans and exhibition curator Lauren Pelletier for exciting glassblowing and flameworking demonstrations to be held at the Asheville Glass Center, located at 140C Roberts Street in Asheville, NC’s River Arts District.

For further information call the CCC&D at 828/890-2050 or visit (www.craftcreativitydesign.org).

Bulldog Pottery in Seagrove, NC, Offers 3rd Cousins in Clay Event – May 28 & 29, 2011

Wednesday, May 11th, 2011

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Work by Peter Lenzo

We ran this article in our May 2011 issue of Carolina Arts, but we’ve learned that everyone doesn’t bother with publications these days. Many people’s attention span is just too short for publications. They like blog entries, Facebook status updates or even tweets.

But, I wanted to make sure people interested in pottery would see this – one way or another. I’m hoping I can make another trip to Seagrove (hold the tornadoes this time – please), but it’s a rough time of the month for us to be gone – unless we’ve finished our June issue early. We’ll have our fingers crossed.

Last year I missed meeting up with Peter Lenzo, who was on his way to the 2nd Clay Cousins, as a visitor, and I had to get back home by that time of the day. We probably passed each other on Hwy. 220. I really admire Lenzo and his work. We have a couple of his crazy head pieces – which are pretty strange. But, I like strange – as do a lot of other folks. And, of course there’s always Max – the bulldog who just keeps on ticking.

I also enjoy talking with Michael Kline, and it’s always a plus when you get all these good and talented folks together. I might even be able to go over to Whynot Pottery and get some cake and see the new exhibit at the NC Pottery Center.

A lot of our friends are beginning to figure out that there must be something going on in Seagrove to keep drawing us back. When they ask – I just smile and say – it’s OK. But they know me and they figure I’m holding something back.

Hey, haven’t I been telling folks to go to Seagrove for years now. Duh!

Here’s that article:

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Work by Jack Troy

Come meet the “Clay Cousins” who are devoted to making pottery as a way of life. On May 28, from 9am-4pm and May 29, from 10am-4pm, Seagrove, NC, potters Bruce Gholson and Samantha Henneke of Bulldog Pottery hold their 3rd annual “Cousins in Clay” event. Once again they will bring a line up of renowned potters to their rural pottery community of Seagrove in central North Carolina. Three nationally known studio art potters, Jack Troy, Michael Kline, and Peter Lenzo will bring their ceramic art to Bulldog Pottery for the special two day event. This will be a wonderful opportunity to meet with the artists and add to your pottery collection or begin one. Bulldog Pottery is located five miles south of Seagrove’s single stop light on Alternate Highway 220.

Creative energy is clearly unlimited for Pennsylvanian potter Jack Troy, who weaves his productive life around his passion for ceramics. He began teaching young artists in 1967 at Juniata College, has taught over 185 workshops, written 2 books about clay, a book of original poems titled Calling the Planet Home, published over 60 articles and book reviews, all while producing a constant stream of pottery at his Pennsylvania studio. Troy gives homage to our state of North Carolina in his Wood-fired Stoneware and Porcelain book (1995), by saying, “If North America has a pottery state it must be North Carolina”.

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Work by Samantha Henneke

Like a writer creating his autobiography, South Carolinian artist Peter Lenzo sculpts head vessels that are symbolic representations of his personal story.  Intrigued by the 19th century southern pottery face jug tradition, Lenzo has created self-portrait face jugs that are clearly unique to his own personal interpretation of this long-standing southern folk art tradition.

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Work by Michael Kline

Michael Kline, a studio potter from the mountains of North Carolina, creates inspired traditional forms that are graced with his elegant floral brushwork giving a botanical theme to his wood-fired pottery jugs and jar forms. Sometimes his pots are covered with a honey amber color glaze that is as appetizing as maple syrup. Kline will be presenting brushwork demonstrations on both Saturday (2pm) and Sunday (1:30pm) during the event.

Bruce Gholson and Samantha Henneke have created a collaborative environment at their Bulldog Pottery studio that provides them the support to express their independent voices, more than they would be able to achieve individually. Their art pottery has become known for an eclectic mix of form, imagery, texture, pattern, and graceful design all integrated by their rich and distinctive glazes.

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Work by Bruce Gholson

Both Bulldog Pottery and Michael Kline share their personal journeys of the day-to-day life of being full time studio potters through their clay blogs. Join them to find out what is happening next in their studio at Micheal Kline’s “Sawdust and Dirt” blog (www.michaelklinepottery.blogspot.com) and Bruce and Samantha’s blog, “Around and About with Bulldog Pottery” (www.bulldogpottery.blogspot.com).

Come out for the day or spend the weekend in the “Seagrove pottery community”, where three North Carolina rural Piedmont counties come together: Randolph (known for the NC Zoo), Moore (known for Pinehurst Golf), and Montgomery (known for the beautiful Uwharrie Mountains). Bulldog Pottery’s “Cousins in Clay” brings together a rich diversity of contemporary ceramics for this two day event. “Cousins in Clay” is a kinship based on shared appreciation for the pursuit of excellence within the diverse language of clay. Visit their website (www.cousinsinclay.com) for more details and information on accommodations in the area or call 336/302-3469.

Where did the “Cousins in Clay” name come from?

The event’s name, ‘Cousins in Clay”, is attributed to fellow potter Michael Kline who referred euphemistically on his blog Sawdust and Dirt to a “visit to his clay cousins in Seagrove”, Bruce and Samantha decided to invite Michael to participate in their first Bulldog Pottery Studio Art sale, and titled it “Cousins in Clay”.  This is now an annual event.

For further information call Bulldog at 910/428-9728 or visit (www.bulldogpottery.com).

Transylvania Community Arts Council in Brevard, NC, Extends Deadline for Picasso Raffle – With Good Reason

Monday, February 21st, 2011

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I received the following e-mail from Tammy Hopkins, executive director of the Transylvania Community Arts Council in Brevard, NC, at Carolina Arts, that they were extending the deadline of the raffle to win a Pablo Picasso print. And I don’t blame them. I once had a raffle for an Ansel Adams photograph that I ended up giving away for nothing. I think the winner is still in shock.

Joke – Man walks into a bar at the local country club and says, “I just purchased a Pablo Picasso print for $100.” There’s no punch line – he just purchased a ticket for the Picasso Print Raffle from TCArts. Now he owns a print valued at $28,000+.

How often do you get a 1 in 300 chance to win – anything?

Here’s the press release:

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The Transylvania Community Arts Council in Brevard, NC, has extended the date for their Picasso drawing. “At this time only 80 tickets have been sold and we really need to sell 300 tickets to help our budget this year,” said Tammy Hopkins executive director of TC Arts. Hopkins also said, “We will hold the drawing as soon as we sell at least 300 tickets.”  The TC Arts Council is selling $100 chances to win this signed Picasso etching valued at $28,500. To buy a ticket go to (www.tcarts-art-raffle.org) and download an order form or call TC Arts and order over the phone at 828/884-2787.

The Picasso comes with a Certificate of Authenticity from Park West Gallery and an original invoice of purchase. The piece is entitled Enlèvement, à cheval (Abduction on Horseback). It is an etching on BFK Rives paper with full margins. Signed in pencil and numbered: dated plate 9 June 1968 III (in reverse). This Picasso is #45 from the edition of 50.

In his ninth decade, Picasso created the remarkable group of etchings known as the 347 series in less than seven months. From March 16 to October 5, 1968. He collaborated in his private studio near Cannes with the master printers Piero and Aldo Crommelynck, who brought in a special press from their atelier in Paris. While combining different cultures, icons and periods in this series, Picasso was able to create a unifying theme throughout; that of the narrator and observer rather than participant. The works are a panorama of compelling imagery, many charged with an erotic tone. Picasso’s command of the challenging techniques of etching, engraving, dry-point and aquatint are revealed forcefully in this 347 works, along with the highly personal and facile drawing ability he possessed in his late years. Commenting on the series, Picasso said, “I spend hour after hour while I draw, observing my creatures and thinking about the mad things they’re up to; basically it’s my way of writing fiction.”

The Transylvania Community Arts Council is a 501c3 non-profit arts organization with the mission “To enhance the quality of life in Transylvania County by celebrating and nurturing the creative spirit of artists, youth and individuals throughout the County.” TC Arts is located at 349 S. Caldwell Street in Brevard, NC.

For more information call TC Arts Council at 828/884-2787. To learn more about the TC Arts Council go to (www.tcarts.org) or their all county arts wesbite at (www.artsofbrevard.org).

Skyuka Fine Art in Tryon, NC, Features Works by Richard Christian Nelson

Wednesday, February 16th, 2011

Here’s an exhibit by one of our supporters which arrived after deadline for our Feb. 2011 issue. If you haven’t picked up on it yet – we’ll always take care of our supporters. We do pretty good when it comes to others, but our supporters make Carolina Arts possible and this blog possible.

Here’s the press release:

Skyuka Fine Art in Tryon, NC, is presenting the exhibit, Richard Christian Nelson-Recent Paintings, on view through Mar. 10, 2011.

Nelson and his wife, Kimberly opened Skyuka Fine Art in January 2011. The gallery features exceptional artwork from renowned artists of the past and present.

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Nelson has built his reputation as ‘Rich’ Nelson. The change to his full name came from the need to be found more easily on the internet. The upcoming show will feature the many sides of his work; landscape oil paintings of the foothills of the Blue Ridge and paintings from his travels. It will also feature recent still life and figurative work, and of course a few portraits. There are a number of still life paintings featuring early 20th century North Carolina pottery, and some figure studies from workshops he has taught recently.

Nelson states that he is, “endlessly fascinated by people, places, and things and considers it a privilege and a challenge to capture some aspect of their essence on canvas. I work toward ‘painterly realism’; good drawing and composition, rendered with strong natural color, in such a way that you can still ‘sense’ or ‘feel’ the paint. The effect of this process is that the subject begins to artfully reveal itself to me and hopefully, the viewer”. All of this work (except some portraiture) is done exclusively from life.

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This artist strives to do museum quality work that will be around long after he and his subjects have left this world. He has won a number of honors in the last year including: ”Finalist-Portrait/Figure” category of The Artists Magazine 27th Annual Art Competition, “1st Place-Oil” and “Honorable Mention-Drawing” from the Portrait Society of America’s ‘Choose Your Medium’ Portrait Competition, and “2nd Place-Portrait Society Of America’s ‘Outdoor Portrait’ Competition”, just to name a few.

Nelson’s work has been featured in American Artist, American Art Collector, International Artist, and The Portrait Society Of America’s magazine, and he is listed in Who’s Who in American Art. Collectors who purchase his work do so not only because they appreciate it, but because his career indicates that interest in his work will only continue to grow.

Hailing from Detroit, MI, Nelson earned his BFA from the College Of Creative Studies in 1988. It was at CCS that he developed his love of painting, drawing, figurative art, and art history. He has been working as an artist ever since, initially as an illustrator, then as a portrait artist, gallery artist, and instructor. Nelson also teaches workshops focusing on landscape, still life and portraiture as well.

The Nelson’s are proud to announce a new promotion for the coming year at the gallery; anyone who purchases artwork by any artist in 2011 will be eligible to win a free framed charcoal portrait (subject of winner’s choice) by Richard Nelson. Each purchase will give a chance at winning one of this award-winning artist’s portraits. A drawing will be held on the gallery’s one year anniversary celebration, Jan. 1, 2012.

Gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday from 10am-5pm, or by appointment. Skyuka Fine Art is located in downtown Tryon at 133 N. Trade Street.

For further information contact the gallery by calling 828/817-3783, visit (www.skyukafineart.com) or (www.richardchristiannelson.com).

Some Articles About Exhibits Taking Place in the Carolinas Which Came In After Our February Deadline

Monday, February 7th, 2011

Some of these came in late – after our Jan. 24 deadline and a few came from folks just discovering us. Some think we should just add them to the paper – after all it’s not printed – it’s electronic, but I say no. That’s what deadlines are for and I don’t want several editions of the paper out there and people hearing about items they missed after they first viewed the paper. And, we might not always give these late articles a second life atCarolina Arts Unleashed. So people need to make that deadline.

If you haven’t seen our Feb. 2011 edition of Carolina Arts, you can find it at this link (Warning – this download can take several minutes) (http://www.carolinaarts.com/211/211carolinaarts.pdf).

Coker College in Hartsville, SC, Features Works by Koichi Yamamoto

An exhibition of prints by Koichi Yamamoto, an assistant professor at the University of Tennessee School of Art, is on view through Feb. 25, 2011, in the Cecelia Coker Bell Gallery located in the Gladys C. Fort Art Building in Hartsville, SC.

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Tochika Ni, by Koichi Yamamoto, a 12″ x 24″ intaglio print

Yamamoto’s show, 00 To 10, includes a selection of intaglio prints (a printing process wherein an image is engraved or acid etched into a metal plate, inked then printed) and prints made with a monotype process, a procedure that yields only a single impression from each plate.

Merging traditional and contemporary approaches to printmaking, Yamamoto has worked with meticulous metal engravings, large-scale relief and intaglio prints. His current work is in large-scale monotypes and exemplifies a contemporary, international aesthetic developed from his upbringing in Japan and his education in Europe and North America. His prints explore issues of the sublime, memory, atmosphere, light and history through various representations of landscape.

“Surface only provides a record from recent events,” Yamamoto said. “Making critical judgments requires an understanding of what lies underneath. Addressing the landscape as subject, my work attempts to describe cross sections of history. I seek to slow down and take time for a deep level of investigation.”

Yamamoto is a graduate of the University of Alberta and Pacific Northwest College of Art. He has also studied at the Bratislava Academy of Art and the Poznan Academy of Art. His work has been included in a number of recent juried print competitions including the Boston Printmakers, the 7th Bharat Bhavan International Biennial Print Art in India and the Lujubljana International Printmaking Exhibition in Slovania. Yamamoto’s prints are in the collections of University of Hawaii at Hilo, the Vivian and Gordon Gilkey Graphic Center in the Portland Art Museum and the University of Alberta Museum and Collection.

The Cecelia Coker Bell Gallery is located in the Gladys C. Fort Art Building on the Coker College campus. Gallery hours are from 10am to 4pm, Monday through Friday, while classes are in session.

Coker College upholds and defends the intellectual and artistic freedom of its faculty and students as they study and create art through which they explore the full spectrum of human experience. The college considers such pursuits central to the spirit of inquiry and thoughtful discussion, which are at the heart of a liberal arts education.

For more information, contact Barb Steadman by calling 843/857-4199.

UNC Asheville in Asheville, NC, Features Laura Hope-Gill’s Poetry and Photographs by John Fletcher Jr.

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UNC Asheville’s Ramsey Library will present the collaborative work of poet Laura Hope-Gill and photographer John Fletcher Jr., on view in Ramsey Library’s Blowers Gallery from Feb.  1- 28, 2011. Hope-Gill and Fletcher will also present a slideshow and poetry reading at 12:30pm, Tuesday, Feb. 8, 2011, in the library’s Whitman Room.

Hope-Gill and Fletcher’s book, The Soul Tree, features photographs of uniquely beautiful southern Appalachian landscapes accompanied by lyric poems, which illuminate themes of vision, faith, healing and the sacredness of nature. The Blowers Gallery exhibit will feature some of the images and poems from the book as well as more recent work inspired byThe Soul Tree.

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The exhibit and the slideshow/poetry reading are free and open to the public.

Hope-Gill is the Poet Laureate of the Blue Ridge Parkway and a recipient of a North Carolina Arts Council fellowship. She is also the founder and director of WordFest Poetry Festival in Asheville, and an instructor in UNC Asheville’s Great Smokies Writing Program. Fletcher is a photographer for the Asheville Citizen-Times. His 20-year career has included clients such asUSA Today, The Associated Press, The Washington Post, and The New York Times.

The gallery is free and open to the public daily and most evenings.

For more information, call 828/251-6336 or visit (http://bullpup.lib.unca.edu/library/exhibits/blowers/exhibits.html).

Greenville Technical College in Taylors, SC, Features Works by Faculty of SC Governor’s School

The Department of Visual and Performing Arts at the Greer campus of Greenville Technical College in Taylors, SC, is presenting an exhibit of works by members of the South Carolina Governor’s School of the Arts and Humanities, on view through Feb. 18, 2011.

Impressive for its scope, the show includes works by photographer Carlyn Tucker, sculptor Joseph Thompson, painter Paul Yanko, ceramists Alice Ballard and Sharon Campbell, printer Katya Cohen, metals artist Ben Gilliam, and graphic designer Neil Summerour. We are pleased to showcase the creative excellence that exemplifies the commitment of arts faculty at this unique Upstate program.

For further information check our SC Institutional Gallery listings call Lisa Smith at 864/848-2044 or e-mail to (lisa.smith@gvltec.edu).

Mesh Gallery in Morganton, NC, Features An Exhibit of Iron Works

Mesh Gallery in Morganton, NC, will present an exhibition showcasing the work of Oak Hill Iron that includes both fine art and utilitarian wares titledIronology. The exhibit will be on view from Feb. 14 through Apr. 8, 2011, with a reception taking place on Friday, Feb. 18, 2011, from 6-9pm.

Oak Hill Iron was born out of necessity and driven by true talent and sheer determination to create beautiful products. Founded over a decade ago by Dean Curfman, Oak Hill Iron produces custom ironwork that meets the needs of countless utilitarian applications as well producing works of fine art that are at home in a gallery space. Both high art and craft are integral parts of a healthy arts community and with this exhibition Oak Hill Iron will demonstrate it’s ability to wear both those hats.

Oak Hill Iron is staffed by a team of highly trained artistic craftsmen and offers a wide selection of ironwork for both residential and commercial projects. There is no job that is considered too big or too small.

As always events at MESH Gallery are free and open to the public. Appetizers (hors d’oeuvres) for this event will be provided by Mountain Burrito of Morganton. Wine will be served by Sour Grapes Wine Distribution.

There will be a free concert starting at 8pm on Feb. 18, during the reception with a performance from Pimalia recording artists Moolah Temple $tringband hailing from Jackson County, NC. The duo of Johnny Favorite & Eden Moor co-pilot their goat-drawn deathcart, trailing the detritus of Old Time, Musique Concrète, Honky Tonk, IDM, Minstrelsy, songs of wounded affection, cautionary tales for our age, and the aesthetics of the Fraternal, Temperance, and Evangelical Movements. Moolah Temple $tringband rarely makes public appearances, but the duo is pleased to be invited by MESH. One clown is merely a clown, but two clowns make a circus.

Mesh Gallery is located at 114-B West Union Street, Morganton, NC.

For further information call 828/437-1957 or e-mail to (eliot@meshgallery.com).

Charleston County Public Library in Charleston, SC, Features Works by Cheryl Baskins Butler

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The Charleston County Public Library in Charleston, SC, will present the exhibit, A Day at the Zoo: Impressions of Riverbanks, featuring works by Cheryl Baskins Butler, on view in the Saul Alexander Foundation Gallery, located in the Main Branch of the CCPL system in downtown Charleston, SC, from Feb. 1 – 28, 2011.

Butler began her sketch “safaris” at the Riverbanks Zoo in Columbia, SC, when it first opened in the mid 70’s. Throughout the ensuing years, she has returned regularly to observe, sketch, paint and spend personal time with the Riverbanks residents. A Day at the Zoo: Impressions of Riverbanks is a compilation of paintings, collages and site sketches from her visits.
The Main Library is located at 68 Calhoun Street in downtown Charleston.

For further information call Frances Richardson at 843/805-6803 or visit (www.ccpl.org).

10th Annual Carolina Pottery Festival Takes Place in Shelby, NC – Nov. 13, 2010

Saturday, October 16th, 2010

Here’s another pottery festival taking place in Western North Carolina this fall. There’s a lot of events going on this fall in the Carolina pottery community.

The 10th Annual Carolina Pottery Festival will take place at the Cleveland County Fairgrounds on Hwy. 74 Business, in Shelby, NC, on Saturday, Nov. 13, 2010, from 10 am to 4 pm.

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Work by Karen Giles

The 10th Carolina Pottery Festival only happens once every 365 days! This year’s Festival will feature more than 100 local and regional potters, showing and selling their work. You can expect to see traditional, contemporary, functional, decorative and sculptural work–something for everyone! Meet the potters who create the work, find out the story behind the pottery which strikes your fancy and enjoy this indoor event at the Cleveland County Fairgrounds.

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Work by Walter Aberson

Admission is $3 for adults (ages 14 and younger are free) and a portion of the proceeds benefits the Cleveland County Arts Council. There is free parking adjacent to the Festival location.

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Work by Linda Dalton

For more information call Vicki Gill at 704/824-9928, e-mail to (V@carolinapotteryfestival.org) or visit (www.carolinapotteryfestival.blogspot.com).