Posts Tagged ‘Carolina Arts’

The May 2017 Issue of “Carolina Arts” is Now Ready to Download

Monday, May 1st, 2017

517carolinaarts-cover

The May 2017 issue of Carolina Arts is up on our website at (http://www.carolinaarts.com/517/517carolinaarts.html) – all 71 pages of it. That’s the same amount of pages as last month – that doesn’t happen that often.

Our cover art features work by Amy Goldstein-Rice of Inman, SC. She is part of the Southern Exposure group in the Upstate of SC. They will be having a show at the Upstate Gallery on Main in Spartanburg, SC. You can read about it on Page 18 of our May issue.

So download that PDF and dig in – it makes for good reading and shows that you have lots of opportunities to enjoy the visual arts in the Carolinas. And, don’t forget to find a way to thank our advertisers – they make the paper possible.

And help us spread the paper around by sending this link to your friends.

If you want to get something in the June 2017 issue – send it now or as soon as you can. Don’t wait till the May 24th deadline.

Thanks – Tom and Linda Starland
Carolina Arts
843/693-1306
info@carolinaarts.com

The April 2017 Issue of “Carolina Arts” is Now Ready to Download

Friday, March 31st, 2017

417carolinaarts-cover

The April 2017 issue of Carolina Arts is up on our website at (http://www.carolinaarts.com/417/417carolinaarts.html) – all 71 pages of it. We’re launching a little early as we have a day away from our computers on Apr. 1st – no fooling.

Our cover art features works by four different abstract artists who will have works on view in exhibits around the Carolinas. William Halsey’s estate is presenting his exhibit in Charleston, SC. We never miss an opportunity to promote his work and we’re also presenting work by one of his former students – Eileen Blyth.

So download that PDF and dig in – it makes for good reading and shows that you have lots of opportunities to enjoy the visual arts in the Carolinas. And, don’t forget to find a way to thank our advertisers – they make the paper possible.

And help us spread the paper around by sending this link to your friends.

If you want to get something in the May 2017 issue – send it now or as soon as you can. Don’t wait till the Apr. 24th deadline.

Thanks – Tom and Linda Starland
Carolina Arts
843/693-1306
info@carolinaarts.com

A Visit to the Ever Changing Charleston, SC, 3/11/17

Sunday, March 12th, 2017

I needed some postcards to send to someone in Washington, DC, that I hoped would be soon taking an extended vacation from politics, and what better place to get postcards but the tourist city of Charleston, SC. The city that seems to add a new construction crane every time I visit. So I figured to also make that trip a short business trip and visit a few galleries.

I’ve been wanting to visit Fabulon, A Center for Art and Education, located at 1017 Wappoo Road, in the West Ashley area of Charleston – between Hwy. 61 and Hwy. 17. They had just opened a new exhibit, “We The People”, an exhibit of artwork that makes you think, something not seen that often in Charleston. They had the opening a day before, but I don’t like seeing art in a crowd, so the day after was good for me.

This was a great show with art from local artists and many from outside the area. As usual I took a few images with my iPhone (I guess that’s less health insurance for me), but these works are best seen up close and personal. And as always works I include are not always the best or ones I want to talk about – they are the works I can get a decent image of. But I also like the ones I’m including.

First up is a photograph by Winston-Salem, NC, artist, Owens Daniels, who offered some images poking fun at the NC House Bill (HB2). This image titled “Citizen” was created in the style of American Gothic.

317Fabulon-Owens Daniels1

Next is “Life is A OK” by local artist, Caroline Self, who was/is Artist-in-Residence for The City of North Charleston Cultural Arts Department. Loved this work for it’s color and texture. I just can’t pass by a well executed abstract work.

317Fabulon-Caroline-Self

Kelly Burke, from the Baltimore, MD, area offered a couple of works from her ‘Reimagined American Flags” series. This work is titled “Don’t Lives Matter?” highlighting lives lost due to gun violence.

317Fabulon-Kelly-Burke

Susan Irish, owner and manager of Fabulon, also had an interesting work in the exhibit that made a statement about Charleston, that only an outsider would understand – which I got right away, but I couldn’t get a good shot of it without my shadow all over it.

There are lots of interesting works in this exhibit, which will give you lots of reasons to think, but don’t miss the artistic skill in thinking of the message offered.

This last work wasn’t part of the “We The People” exhibit, but it caught my attention and of course it’s an abstract. It’s a work by Laura McRae-Hitchcock , who has recently moved from Charlotte, NC, to our community. So, besides the works in the show, there are also good works to see – and buy, on view by resident artists.

317Fabulon-Laura-McRae-Hitchcock

Fabulon may not be one of those high-end Charleston galleries, but it’s an example of all things good don’t always come in shiny packages, it’s also a working studio, classroom, and gathering center – there was a group of fiber artists on hand working away while I viewed the exhibit.

Well it was time to get my postcards which I found at Brittlebank Park on the Ashley River – not your usual place to get postcards, but I’m hoping you’ll be reading about and hearing about these special postcards on about March 16 or 17.

Next I stopped by Surface Craft Gallery, located at 49 John Street in downtown Charleston, my old stomping grounds when Linda (my better half) and I operated a custom photo processing lab on John Street and a short lived photography gallery – many years ago. I wanted to talk with Liv Antonecchia, owner, and get caught up on how the new group, Lowcountry Ceramic Artists, was coming along and see what new things they had in the shop.

Here are some works by Margaret K. Weinberg, who is part of the Cone 10 Studios in Charleston, which may be closing soon.

317surface-craft-Margaret-K.-Weinberg

Next are works by Batton Clayworks in Asheville, NC. They are the works with the carved texture. I love these unusual shapes.

317surface-craft-Batton-Clayworks-Asheville

Here are a couple of fused glass works by Tanya Craig. These are incense holders, but I don’t remember seeing any that were so colorful – back in my days of burning incense. The last time I bought incense was about ten years ago just outside of Disney World in Florida, but when we got home – I couldn’t find them and to this day never have.

317surface-craft-Tanya-Craig

This last shot is of a jar by Fred Prudhomme, another Cone 10 Studios artist. I shared a Facebook post that Surface Craft had made earlier in the week which attracted a lot of remarks about how beautiful the jar was but it would be much better if it was full of cookies and then milk got involved and than more comments about food were added, but when I saw this piece in person, it was much smaller than we all thought. It was about half the size of a cookie jar. I still like the jar, but man I was really disappointed that you wouldn’t be able to fit many cookies in it. Again – here was a case where art had effected my life once more – beauty and disappointment offered in the same object. Darn you artists.

317Surface-craft-Fren-Prudhomme

Surface Craft Gallery had become one of my favorite spots to see fine art crafts in Charleston. If you haven’t been there check it out.

Surface Craft Gallery will be opening a new exhibit, “Spring!”, a ceramics renewal show featuring local and national clay artisans in both functional and sculptural work, with an opening reception on Mar. 23, from 5-8pm. The show continues through Apr. 13, 2017. Work by Kelly Thiel will be featured in the show. She left us to live in Bend, OR, but now her work is returning to Charleston.

Well, it was time to head back home to Bonneau and as I drove out of Charleston down Meeting Street I just couldn’t believe how they are changing the skyline of Charleston – pretty soon you won’t be able to see the sky. So sad. I still love you Charleston, but now I know how the old timers felt and talked of their “lost” Charleston when I first got here in the mid 70s.

The March 2017 Issue of “Carolina Arts” is Now Ready to Download

Wednesday, March 1st, 2017

317carolinaarts-cover

The March 2017 issue of Carolina Arts is up on our website at (http://www.carolinaarts.com/317/317carolinaarts.html) – all 70 pages of it – ten more than last month.

So download that PDF and dig in – it makes for good reading and shows that you have lots of opportunities to enjoy the visual arts in the Carolinas. And, don’t forget to find a way to thank our advertisers – they make the paper possible.

And help us spread the paper around by sending this link to your friends.

If you want to get something in the April 2017 issue – send it now or as soon as you can. Don’t wait till the Mar. 24th deadline. I warned people last month about the short month and that they should get their info in early as we would have to move at a break-neck speed to get the March issue done. Unfortunately a few didn’t listen or didn’t read my commentary and they got left behind on the – after deadline e-mail pile. Don’t ever wait for the last minute to participate. Time waits for no one.

Thanks – Tom and Linda Starland
Carolina Arts
843/693-1306
info@carolinaarts.com

The February 2017 Issue of “Carolina Arts” is Now Ready to Download

Wednesday, February 1st, 2017

217carolinaarts_cover

The February 2017 issue of Carolina Arts is up on our website at (http://www.carolinaarts.com/217/217carolinaarts.html) – all 60 pages of it – a few more than last month.

So download that PDF and dig in – it makes for good reading and shows that you have lots of opportunities to enjoy the visual arts in the Carolinas. And, don’t forget to find a way to thank our advertisers – they make the paper possible.

And help us spread the paper around by sending this link to your friends.

If you want to get something in the March 2017 issue – send it now or as soon as you can. Don’t wait till the Feb. 24th deadline. It’s a short month so our deadline is very important this month. Please get your info to us well before the deadline of Feb. 24 so we have time to get our March issue produced in time. We’ll be moving at break-neck speed so don’t be late or you’ll be left behind.

Thanks – Tom and Linda Starland
Carolina Arts
843/693-1306
info@carolinaarts.com

The January 2017 Issue of “Carolina Arts” is Now Ready to Download

Sunday, January 1st, 2017

117carolinaarts-cover

The January 2017 issue of Carolina Arts is up on our website at (http://www.carolinaarts.com/117/117carolinaarts.html) – all 56 pages of it – a few less than last month. It’s a new year and some people are never ready for it. Our cover image is by Yvette L. Cummings of Conway, SC.

So download that PDF and dig in – it makes for good reading and shows that you have lots of opportunities to enjoy the visual arts in the Carolinas. And, don’t forget to find a way to thank our advertisers – they make the paper possible.

And help us spread the paper around by sending this link to your friends.

If you want to get something in the February 2017 issue – send it now or as soon as you can. Don’t wait till the Jan. 24th deadline. You do know you can be early. Some folks are already several months ahead of the deadline when their press release would be due.

Thanks – Tom and Linda Starland
Carolina Arts
843/693-1306
info@carolinaarts.com

The December 2016 Issue of “Carolina Arts” is Now Ready to Download

Thursday, December 1st, 2016

1216carolinaarts-cover

The December 2016 issue of Carolina Arts is up on our website at (http://www.carolinaarts.com/1216/1216carolinaarts.html) – all 62 pages of it – a few less than last month.

So download that PDF and dig in – it makes for good reading and shows that you have lots of opportunities to enjoy the visual arts in the Carolinas. And, don’t forget to find a way to thank our advertisers – they make the paper possible.

And help us spread the paper around by sending this link to your friends.

If you want to get something in the January 2017 issue – send it now or as soon as you can. Don’t wait till Christmas Eve, Dec. 24th deadline. You do know you can be early. Some folks are already several months ahead of the deadline when their press release would be due.

Thanks – Tom and Linda Starland
Carolina Arts
843/693-1306
info@carolinaarts.com

My Not So Annual Trip to the Celebration of Seagrove Potters in Seagrove, NC

Monday, November 28th, 2016

I didn’t get to go to the first Celebration of Seagrove Potters in 2008, but I’ve been writing about it way before then, since I got myself in the middle of a heated battle going on in Seagrove, NC, the center of pottery in North Carolina. There was a fight going on between a slick festival promoter, his Seagrove sidekick, and a group of long term potters from the Seagrove area – potters who’s families have been throwing pots in the area for generations. And I think time has proven that I took the right side way back when – now nine Celebrations ago.

I’m not going to rehash the problem or even name names – mostly because no one can hardly remember the other two dudes. That’s what happens when a new idea becomes an annual success. And, that’s what the Celebration of Seagrove Potters is – a resounding success. 2017 will be its 10th anniversary – our 30th in doing an arts publication and the 20th for Carolina Arts. How time flies.

When we got our tickets in the mail from the good folks at the Celebration, Linda had to do some horse trading to get a few days off from her 911 job and we booked a room in a hotel in Asheboro, NC, where everyone else there is either going to the Celebration or the NC Zoo.

It’s about a five hour trip from Bonneau Beach, SC, the headquarters of PSMG, Inc. to Seagrove – depending on how many stops we have to make. The older we get the more stops it seems to take. Maybe with all that infrastructure building our new President has promised the I-74/73 highway will get finished and it will be down to a four hour trip, but we won’t hold our breath.

When we got to the hotel we got a surprise – the woman who checked us in was the sister of Rhonda McCanless, who used to write a column about Seagrove for us before she went to work for the STARworks Center for Creative Enterprise in Star, NC. Rhonda is married to Eck McCanless, one of the overly talented McCanless clan of potters and musicians in the Seagrove area. You might say that in Seagrove potters grow on trees – family trees that is.

Next stop was the Friday night Gala at the Celebration at the historic Luck’s Cannery just outside of downtown Seagrove. That’s an inside joke for anyone who has been to Seagrove. There’s not much of a town there, but it is the capital of pottery in North Carolina – pretty much the Southeast. And on the weekend before Thanksgiving every year the Celebration of Seagrove Potters takes place featuring over 75 local potters. This town might be small but it goes big when it comes to pottery events in that – believe it or not – there’s another big pottery festival which takes place that same weekend in another location. So little old Seagrove offers two major pottery events on the same weekend. It’s pottery madness.

The Gala is a special event made for serious collectors, who pay $45 to get a first chance to buy the latest works right out of the kiln and a chance at owning special collaborative works, created by two area potters, offered at a live auction. These one-of-a-kind works are fought over by collectors who want something no one else can own. It’s a fundraiser, so when the bidding gets hot – the winner does a lot of good for the pottery community. One of these works, a pot created by Ben Owen III of Ben Owen Pottery and Takura Shibata of Studio Touya went for over $1,450+. This was a sort of East meets West creation since Takura and his wife Hitomi, also a gifted potter, moved from Japan to USA and then Seagrove. But some bidders got some real bargains.

1216celebration-auction-zeke-frank
This was a work created by Zeke McCanless of Dover Pottery and Frank Neef of Pottery by Frank Neef – it’s high bid almost reached $1,000.

1116celebration-auction-ben-owen
This is the pot by Ben Owen III of Ben Owen Pottery and Takura Shibata of Studio Touya

But the Gala is much more than buying pottery – it’s good food and drink with live entertainment, good conversation with the folks who create all these wonderful pots, and an opportunity to learn about this pottery community as several organizations are also involved – the NC Pottery Center and STARworks Center for Creative Enterprise, which is not only involved in promoting pottery, pottery supplies, glass making, glass making equipment, teaching classes, and much more.

Of course you can get a lot of this during the sales event Sat. and Sun., but you’ll miss out on the collaborative works. Admission is only $5 these days and parking is free.

1116celebration-crowd-shot

For me – it’s mostly about conversations and some adding to our pottery collection. And that’s why I don’t have hundreds of images of pottery to show you. I talk too much and forget to take photos, but then again I want you to go experience this event yourself not just look at my pictures of the event.

If you have never been to Seagrove and you like pottery, going will be an experience you’ll never forget. Some folks make going there a regular habit. Many do their holiday shopping during the Celebration. Oh the lucky folks on their lists. If you have been there but it was some time ago – new potters are moving there and setting up shop all the time. And, of course there are always new generations of historic pottery families coming on line.

The 10th Annual Celebration of Seagrove Potters will take place Nov. 17-19, 2017. For more information about that and other events taking place in Seagrove visit (www.DiscoverSeagrove.com).

So here’s some more images of our visit this year.

1116celebration-whynot-tile-flower
Our first stop is always the Whynot Pottery booth, the folks who first got me to Seagrove. These art tiles being shown are being offered through Acacia Art Tile at Whynot and are made by Meredith Heywood.

1216celebration-acacia2

1216celebration-acacia3

1216celebration-acacia4

1216celebration-acacia5

1216celebration-bulldog2
Our next stop is usually to the Bulldog Pottery booth, where we’ll meet up with Samantha Henneke and Bruce Gholson and their crew Gloria and Ed Henneke, Samantha’s parents.

1216celebration-bulldog3

1116celebration-bulldog-pottery

1116celebration-carol-gentithes
This clay dog is guarding the booth for Johnston & Gentithes Art Pottery. He was created by Carol Gentithes.

1116celebration-lucks-ware
Here’s a face jug by Sid Luck of Luck’s Ware, Sid is a cultural treasure in North Carolina.

1116celebration-dean-martin-pottery
Here’s a view of the booth of Dean & Martin Pottery (love that name). They incorporate images from the 60’s in their work. I knew most of the people I saw on their pots – how is that possible – oh yeah – I’m old.

1116celebration-crystal-king-pottery
This little bear is having fun with a butterfly at the Crystal King Pottery booth.

1216celebration-ben-owen-iii
Here’s a view of works at the Ben Owen Pottery booth.

1216celebration-jlk-jewelry1
Always a favorite stop for Linda is the JLK Jewelry booth. I finally got Linda to stop looking and buy something.

1216celebration-jlk-jewelry2
OK – you’re wondering what this jewelry has to do with a pottery event. All the stones you see in these works are made of clay.

There were lots of other booths we visited who had wonderful works, but as I said I talk to much and forgot to take photos.

1216celebration-ray-pottery1
Now speaking about talking too much – it has it cost. Last year I had my eye on adding a work to our collection from Ray Pottery. I love red in artwork, but I spent too much time talking last year and by the time I got back to their booth – the pieces I had my eye on were gone. So it was a first order of business this year and their booth was across from Whynot Pottery’s booth, but no one was there. That was frustrating as I knew I’d get talking again. Mark Heywood said to pick what I wanted and he’d hold it for me until the Ray Pottery booth was open for business. Now that’s service and a reflection of this community.

1216celebration-ray-pottery1-a
Here’s a side view of this piece. There’s lot of details to enjoy.

1216celebration-whynot-mug
I also got this mug from Whynot Pottery to match a little pot we found while visiting Whynot’s studio last year. It was a glaze that they had used in the past but had trouble getting it to come out right in the kiln process – so it was a real find. Well they have worked out that process and had lots of works with this glaze available this year. Oh, you didn’t know that most of the potters at the Celebration also opened their studio/galleries during that weekend so you can see even more of their works – well they do.

Hey folks, stick with me and I’ll let you know all the things I’m learning. In fact, I’m thinking of organizing a tour bus to the 10th Celebration from the Charleston, SC, area next year. Stay tuned for details.

The November 2016 Issue of “Carolina Arts” is Now Ready to Download

Tuesday, November 1st, 2016

1116carolinaarts-cover

The November 2016 issue of Carolina Arts is up on our website at (http://www.carolinaarts.com/1116/1116carolinaarts.html) – all 69 pages of it – a few less than last month.

So download that PDF and dig in – it makes for good reading and shows that you have lots of opportunities to enjoy the visual arts in the Carolinas. And, don’t forget to find a way to thank our advertisers – they make the paper possible.
And help us spread the paper around by sending this link to your friends.

If you want to get something in the December 2016 issue – send it now or as soon as you can. Don’t be a “turkey” and wait till the November 24th deadline. You do know you can be early. Some folks are already several months ahead of the deadline when their press release would be due.

Thanks – Tom and Linda Starland
Carolina Arts
843/693-1306
info@carolinaarts.com

The October 2016 Issue of “Carolina Arts” is Now Ready to Download

Saturday, October 1st, 2016

1016carolinaarts-cover

The October 2016 issue of Carolina Arts is up on our website at (http://www.carolinaarts.com/1016/1016carolinaarts.html) – all 80 pages of it – a few more than last month.
So download that PDF and dig in – it makes for good reading and shows that you have lots of opportunities to enjoy the visual arts in the Carolinas. And, don’t forget to find a way to thank our advertisers – they make the paper possible.
And help us spread the paper around by sending this link to your friends.
If you want to get something in the November 2016 issue – send it now or as soon as you can. Don’t wait till the October 24th deadline. You do know you can be early. Some folks are already several months ahead of the deadline when their press release would be due.

Thanks – Tom and Linda Starland
Carolina Arts
843/693-1306 (a new number)
info@carolinaarts.com