Posts Tagged ‘Monty Busick’

NC Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC, Features New Exhibit of Works by NC Pottery Collectors

Friday, November 19th, 2010

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The North Carolina Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC, will present the exhibition, Collector’s Eye, Series I: Seven Perspectives, on view from Nov. 23, 2010 through Feb. 12, 2011. An opening reception will be held on Saturday, Dec. 4, 2010, from 3:30-5:30pm and is being sponsored by The North Carolina Pottery Collectors’ Guild, based in Raleigh, NC. The Reception is free and open to the public.

This exhibit will explore North Carolina pottery through pieces selected by seven North Carolina collectors. The collectors in this series are Monty Busick, Steve Compton, Bragg Cox, Leon Danielson, Joe Foster, George Hoffman and Joe Wilkinson. This exhibit presents an interesting perspective on North Carolina pottery. This is the first of the Collector’s Eye series that will begin the visual journey around the state through the collector’s eyes.

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Monty Busick, an educator for 37 years and currently a consultant for Wake County Schools, is the current president of the NC Pottery Collectors’ Guild. His collection is from the Seagrove and Pittsboro areas, focusing on Mark Hewitt’s apprentice’s work.

Leon Danielson, an Economics Educator at NC State in Raleigh, and wife Sue moved to NC in 1972. They collect NC art and utilitarian pottery generally with emphasis on Hilton Pottery from the Catawba Valley. Their collection of Tobacco Road Pottery is remarkable; they established this business with a partner in 1979 utilizing the turning skills of C.B. Craven and the artistic talents of Ernestine Hilton Sigmon.

Joe Wilkinson, an Antique and Fine Arts dealer from Spring Hope, worked summers in the early 1970’s with Dot and Walter Auman at Seagrove Pottery, developing a concentrated interest in pottery. Wilkinson collects Transition Period Pottery 1916-1930 and utilitarian pottery being transformed by Arts and Crafts influences.

Steve Compton was first introduced to North Carolina’s pottery traditions in the mid 1970’s while on assignment as a photographer for the Mebane Enterprise-Journal. Compton collects 18th to 19th century earthenware, utilitarian salt-glazed and alkaline-glazed stoneware, and early to mid-20th century art pottery. He is currently District Superintendent for the North Carolina Conference of The United Methodist Church.

Bragg Cox, a North Carolina native, has collected NC Pottery for twelve years; he collects early utilitarian, transitional, art and figurals from North Carolina and focuses on pieces with exceptional glazes, decoration and form. He also collects Southern decorative arts including folk art.

Joe Foster is a self taught potter, having begun as a pottery collector. He began working for Archie Teague around his shop in the 1990’s where he learned a great deal. When Archie died suddenly in 1998 Foster found himself with the increased responsibility for the day to day operations of the shop.

George Hoffman, originally from Delaware, OH, has been collecting pottery for twenty five years. He began collecting North Carolina pots when he was traveling down Hwy 220 from Ohio and stopped in Seagrove at Seagrove Pottery on his way to Seven Lakes. He collects early Jugtown, early Ben Owen III, Billy Ray Hussey, and candlesticks.

Exhibitions are made possible through the generosity of our membership, the Mary and Elliott Wood Foundation and the Goodnight Educational Foundation. This project was supported by the NC Arts Council, a division of the Department of Cultural Resources, with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts.

The mission of the North Carolina Pottery Center is to promote public awareness of and appreciation for the history, heritage, and ongoing tradition of pottery making in North Carolina.

The North Carolina Pottery Collectors’ Guild is organized for the purpose of fostering and supporting the folk pottery heritage of North Carolina and the interest of those with affinity for the rich traditions and wares of this industry. The Guild’s efforts advance this purpose in numerous ways including: collecting, organizing, and sharing information related to North Carolina potteries, potters, and their wares; identifying knowledgeable persons; documenting collections and research materials associated with North Carolina pottery; encouraging new North Carolina pottery collectors, and expanding the market for North Carolina pottery.

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The Center is located at 233 East Avenue in Seagrove, NC. Hours of operation are Tue. – Sat., 10am – 4pm.

For more information call 336/873-8430 or visit (www.ncpotterycenter.org).